Correctional Medical Care Inc.
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PCWG, 1114 Brandt Drive, Tallahassee FL 32308


Schenectady County Jail, New York
Feb 4, 2017 PCWG dailygazette.com
Suit filed in death of Schenectady County inmate
Schenectady County Jail medical officials failed to properly care for an inmate in 2015, resulting in his death, according to a new lawsuit. Michael Revels, 57, who entered the jail in September 2015, was a kidney cancer survivor who required constant medication, the suit reads. By mid-November 2015, constant interruptions to his medication left him near death, Revels' family contends. He died at the hospital shortly afterward because of faulty care while in the jail's custody, the suit reads. "These conditions could have been easily treated had Mr. Revels been sent to the hospital or been monitored by a qualified medical provider" during his time at the jail, the suit reads. Revels estate is suing the jail's medical provider, Correctional Medical Care, as well as Schenectady County and several individuals. They filed the suit in federal court in Albany last week. An attorney for Correctional Medical Care could not be reached Monday. Schenectady County Attorney Christopher Gardner said the county believes there's no basis for the suit. According to the suit, Revels' medication regimen began to be routinely interrupted upon entering the jail. He received the wrong medication, failed to get refills and received cheaper and less effective medication, it alleges. He underwent tests at the jail, but no real treatment, the suit reads. The jail medical staff made no contact with Revels' specialists and made decisions without being medically qualified to do so, the suit continues. Jail officers found Revels unconscious in his cell on Nov. 18, 2015, but he wasn't hospitalized until two days later. Revels fell into a coma and died at the hospital Nov. 25, 2015, the suit reads. The suit also contends jail officials sought and won Revels' release after transporting him to the hospital, a move that placed the financial burden of the hospital stay on his family. The estate's attorney, E. Robert Keach, has sued Correctional Medical Care multiple times in the past, winning settlements that include a $425,000 settlement in a 2013 Schenectady County Jail death. Keach cites several of the previous cases in his suit, calling the Revels case part of a "well-documented pattern" of the company providing inadequate care. Another lawsuit in a Schenectady County Jail death was settled earlier this month, records show. Details of that settlement have yet to be released. Such settlements involve no county money, Gardner has said. The medical provider covers all such lawsuits. Payouts, if any, are fully paid by CMC. The county budgets about $2.5 million for inmate health services overall. The jail saw about 3,000 inmates booked in 2015, requiring 23,000 medical encounters, officials have said. Overall, the county is satisfied with the care provided by CMC, Gardner said. "The county and the sheriff are continually monitoring any issues that may arise ... and we're constantly working to improve the provision of medical care," Gardner said.

Jan 15, 2017 dailygazette.com
New York: Wrongful death suit settled
SCHENECTADY -- The estate of a man who took his own life in the Schenectady County Jail in 2014 has reached a settlement with the jail's medical provider in a lawsuit filed over the death, records show. Details of the settlement over the death of 29-year-old Lucky Lee Wilkins Jr., were not available Wednesday, but U.S. District Court records indicate the two sides reached the agreement after lengthy discussions last week. Whatever the settlement is, Schenectady County Attorney Christopher Gardner indicated it involves no county money. The jail's medical provider, Correctional Medical Care, chose to settle the case, Gardner noted. The settlement agreement now goes to the presiding judge, Magistrate Judge Daniel J. Stewart, for approval. Stewart will also decide on a request to seal the details of the settlement. A different judge rejected a request to seal details in a similar Schenectady County Jail case settlement a year ago. Wilkins died in county custody on May 28, 2014. Jail employees discovered him with a sheet around his neck, the other end tied to a bar at the top of the cell, according to court documents. He had been jailed on a felony drug charge for more than two months and was being held on $25,000 bail. In the original lawsuit, filed in August 2015, his estate contended Wilkins showed signs of severe depression, including suicidal thoughts, during his time in the jail. The estate alleged Wilkins sought assistance for depression from medical staff at the jail and at Ellis Hospital but was never provided any meaningful care. The estate originally included claims against Ellis, but those were later dropped. The suit alleged Wilkins received no medical treatment, causing his eath. The attorney for Wilkins' estate, E. Robert Keach, refused to comment on the settlement. An attorney for Correctional Medical Care could not be reached Wednesday. While no taxpayer money is going to the settlement, Gardner said the county doesn't think there was "any wrongdoing on anyone's part." The state Commission of Corrections, which looks into all in-custody deaths, issued its final report in the fall that showed fellow inmates told investigators Wilkins had been upset over a breakup with his girlfriend and over his criminal case. The public portion of the redacted report, released Wednesday as a result of a Freedom of Information Law request, includes no testimony or indication that Wilkins reached out for help from staff or others. The report recommended the investigation be closed as a suicide. Correctional Medical Care covers all such lawsuits. Payouts, if any, are fully paid by CMC. Keach noted in the original lawsuit that there have been previous allegations against Correctional Medical Care in Schenectady County and elsewhere. He also noted a state attorney general's settlement with the company, in alleging a "pattern of difficulties." Keach also represented the family of Nicole Carmen, who died in Schenectady County custody on April 29, 2013. She died from complications of opiate withdrawal, her suit contended. Carmen's family won a $425,000 settlement from Correctional Medical Care. The judge in that case, David N. Hurd, rejected a request from the attorneys to keep that resolution confidential and sealed. Hurd noted the significance of the allegations in the case and the substantial settlement in ordering the Carmen resolution to be publicly disclosed. He also cited the prior allegations, finding a "strong public interest" that the Carmen settlement should be open.

Feb 13, 2016 timesunion.com
$10 million each sought for two inmate deaths at Schenectady County Jail
The estates of an inmate with major heart-related problems who died in his cell at the Schenectady County Jail and another prisoner at the facility who survived kidney cancer only to become so badly bloated that he died at Ellis Hospital have put the county on notice that they plan to file wrongful death suits. The deaths of Michael Revels and Jimmy Richardson occurred about 2 months apart and a notice of claim filed Friday by their attorney alleges both might still be alive if they had received proper medical care from Correctional Medical Care Inc., a firm the county has contracted for years to treat its inmates. During that time, Elmer Keach III, an attorney representing Revels and Richardson, contends the county was negligent in hiring the Philadelphia-area company as a medical provider at the jail, "given the company's troubled past." Sheriff Dominic Dagostino and County Attorney Chris Gardner rejected the allegations. "It's our position that regardless of who the medical provider was or is that the outcome would have been the same with regard to these three individuals because of their declining health," said Dagostino. The third inmate the sheriff mentioned is Terrance Duncan. He died at the jail in August. On Friday, Dagostino said officials are awaiting toxicology results as part of their internal probe into Duncan's death. Keach contends that what he generally sees is that CMC doesn't provide inmates with adequate follow-up care after being notified by correction officers of health issues. He surmised the company receives incentives for steering inmates to the hospital. County Attorney Chris Gardner dismissed Keach's claim against CMC as a "bright shining lie," stressing that the county pays for any extra medical costs, including hospitalization and specialty care that inmates require. "We believe they are patently baseless lawsuits," Gardner added. He noted with the more than 3,000 inmates housed at the jail each year, there will be some who are really sick and their time behind bars is for many defendants is the first time they receive adequate medical care. "We do provide very good medical care to the inmates, and not all inmates are going to be healthy," said Gardner. Correctional Medical Care did not return a call Friday seeking comment. The notices of claim, precursors of a lawsuit, filed Friday on behalf of the estates of Revels and Richardson by their widows, separately seek $10 million in damages for each man's pain and suffering. Revels, 57, who was serving time for driving without a license, died Nov. 25. He was a kidney cancer survivor who required a diuretic medication to help his kidneys get rid of excess fluid from his body. At the jail, the notice of claim alleges, on several occasions Revels got the wrong medication or cheaper, less effective ones, or didn't get them at all. The court papers also contend that despite being well aware of his medical condition, the staff at the jail punished him for lying down in his cell when he felt sick before lock-in. By November, Revels' condition worsened to the point, the notice says, that he was regularly collapsing on the floor. He was found unconscious by medical and jail staff on Nov. 16 and Nov. 20. On the later date, the claim states Revels was taken to Ellis Hospital where he was so badly bloated that the doctor had to drain 7 liters of fluid around his kidneys and other organs. There are about five liters of blood in the human body, the notice indicates. The fluid buildup sent Revels into cardiac arrest. He was taken off life support on Nov. 25. The notice of claim says after Revels died, the county secured his release and his wife got stuck with paying his remaining medical bills. In Richardson's case, he landed at the jail on Jan. 5, a day after being arrested by Schenectady police for violating an order of protection. He spent his first night in custody at Ellis Hospital for assorted medical problems ranging from high blood pressure to asthma and a potentially fatal irregular heartbeat. The notice of claim indicates that jail guards failed to check on Richardson, 53, or notify medical staff even though his breathing was so labored that other inmates could hear him gurgling all night long. At the time, Richardson was on a medical supervision status, meaning the correction officers should have been checking him every 15 minutes. The notice says that on Jan. 17 Richardson, who was awaiting trial on a criminal contempt charge, died alone in his cell of high blood pressure, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia and an enlarged heart. It also alleges jail and medical staff should have known about Richardson's health problems because he had been incarcerated at the facility in 2015 and had not received the proper medical care or his medication, resulting in him experiencing breathing problems. "Failing to provide medical treatment to someone experiencing severe breathing problems is inexcusable," the notice of claim states. "There is no question that officials at the Schenectady County jail knew about Mr. Richardson's serious medical condition, as he had informed them about his condition on several prior incarcerations. Nevertheless, Mr. Richardson would be alive today if he was provided appropriate and timely medical treatment and supervision."

Feb 7, 2016 timesunion.com
$10 million each sought for two inmate deaths at Schenectady County Jail
The estates of an inmate with major heart-related problems who died in his cell at the Schenectady County Jail and another prisoner at the facility who survived kidney cancer only to become so badly bloated that he died at Ellis Hospital have put the county on notice that they plan to file wrongful death suits. The deaths of Michael Revels and Jimmy Richardson occurred about 2 months apart and a notice of claim filed Friday by their attorney alleges both might still be alive if they had received proper medical care from Correctional Medical Care Inc., a firm the county has contracted for years to treat its inmates. During that time, Elmer Keach III, an attorney representing Revels and Richardson, contends the county was negligent in hiring the Philadelphia-area company as a medical provider at the jail, "given the company's troubled past." Sheriff Dominic Dagostino and County Attorney Chris Gardner rejected the allegations. "It's our position that regardless of who the medical provider was or is that the outcome would have been the same with regard to these three individuals because of their declining health," said Dagostino. The third inmate the sheriff mentioned is Terrance Duncan. He died at the jail in August. On Friday, Dagostino said officials are awaiting toxicology results as part of their internal probe into Duncan's death. Keach contends that what he generally sees is that CMC doesn't provide inmates with adequate follow-up care after being notified by correction officers of health issues. He surmised the company receives incentives for steering inmates to the hospital. County Attorney Chris Gardner dismissed Keach's claim against CMC as a "bright shining lie," stressing that the county pays for any extra medical costs, including hospitalization and specialty care that inmates require. "We believe they are patently baseless lawsuits," Gardner added. He noted with the more than 3,000 inmates housed at the jail each year, there will be some who are really sick and their time behind bars is for many defendants is the first time they receive adequate medical care. "We do provide very good medical care to the inmates, and not all inmates are going to be healthy," said Gardner. Correctional Medical Care did not return a call Friday seeking comment. The notices of claim, precursors of a lawsuit, filed Friday on behalf of the estates of Revels and Richardson by their widows, separately seek $10 million in damages for each man's pain and suffering. Revels, 57, who was serving time for driving without a license, died Nov. 25. He was a kidney cancer survivor who required a diuretic medication to help his kidneys get rid of excess fluid from his body. At the jail, the notice of claim alleges, on several occasions Revels got the wrong medication or cheaper, less effective ones, or didn't get them at all. The court papers also contend that despite being well aware of his medical condition, the staff at the jail punished him for lying down in his cell when he felt sick before lock-in. By November, Revels' condition worsened to the point, the notice says, that he was regularly collapsing on the floor. He was found unconscious by medical and jail staff on Nov. 16 and Nov. 20. On the later date, the claim states Revels was taken to Ellis Hospital where he was so badly bloated that the doctor had to drain 7 liters of fluid around his kidneys and other organs. There are about five liters of blood in the human body, the notice indicates. The fluid buildup sent Revels into cardiac arrest. He was taken off life support on Nov. 25. The notice of claim says after Revels died, the county secured his release and his wife got stuck with paying his remaining medical bills. In Richardson's case, he landed at the jail on Jan. 5, a day after being arrested by Schenectady police for violating an order of protection. He spent his first night in custody at Ellis Hospital for assorted medical problems ranging from high blood pressure to asthma and a potentially fatal irregular heartbeat. The notice of claim indicates that jail guards failed to check on Richardson, 53, or notify medical staff even though his breathing was so labored that other inmates could hear him gurgling all night long. At the time, Richardson was on a medical supervision status, meaning the correction officers should have been checking him every 15 minutes. The notice says that on Jan. 17 Richardson, who was awaiting trial on a criminal contempt charge, died alone in his cell of high blood pressure, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia and an enlarged heart. It also alleges jail and medical staff should have known about Richardson's health problems because he had been incarcerated at the facility in 2015 and had not received the proper medical care or his medication, resulting in him experiencing breathing problems. "Failing to provide medical treatment to someone experiencing severe breathing problems is inexcusable," the notice of claim states. "There is no question that officials at the Schenectady County jail knew about Mr. Richardson's serious medical condition, as he had informed them about his condition on several prior incarcerations. Nevertheless, Mr. Richardson would be alive today if he was provided appropriate and timely medical treatment and supervision."