Correctional Medical Care Inc.
RAP SHEET
 If you find our website useful, please consider sending us a contribution!!!
PCWG, 1114 Brandt Drive, Tallahassee FL 32308


Albany County Jail
Albany, New York
Jul 29, 2017 timesunion.com
Albany County inmate's death 'shocks the conscience
It took five agonizing days for Mark Cannon to die. His death spiral began at the Albany County jail when nurses for a private medical company brushed off the 24-year-old's severe neurological symptoms as heat exhaustion, instructing guards to give him some water and let him rest. Twelve hours later, Cannon's condition had deteriorated to the point where he lay nearly motionless on the floor of an infirmary cell with foam oozing from his mouth. A nurse patted his arm and wiped away the saliva, wrongly believing Cannon was recovering from a seizure even though he had no history of medical problems. When the nurse finally contacted a doctor for advice, he instructed her to immediately call an ambulance. But it was too late. At Albany Medical Center, doctors determined Cannon had suffered a stroke — a loss of blood flow — to his brain stem that his attorney believes may have been caused when he was exercising in the recreation yard on the day he fell ill. Emergency surgery might have saved his life, but too many hours passed after the injury. He lingered for several days before being declared brain dead. At his family's request, Cannon was removed from life support. Last year, an investigation ordered by the state Commission of Correction determined the care given to Cannon at the jail in August 2014 was "so grossly inadequate ... it shocks the conscience." The investigation cited multiple missteps by nurses, including their repeated failure to acknowledge the severity of Cannon's symptoms or consult a physician until it was too late. "Mark Cannon had a progressively deteriorating neurological situation that was completely disregarded by nursing staff despite dramatic signs and symptoms of an active neurological emergency and Cannon's repeated requests for medical care," the investigative report states. The criticism wasn't an anomaly for Correctional Medical Care, a Pennsylvania-based private company. A month after Cannon's death in August 2014 — but long before his case was investigated — the office of New York's attorney general reached an agreement with the company that allowed it to remain in business in New York with monitoring through May 2018. The company paid a $200,000 penalty and agreed to improve staffing levels and training practices. At the time of that agreement, Correctional Medical Care -— or CMC — had contracts worth more than $32 million a year with 13 county jails in New York, including Albany and Schenectady counties' facilities. It has maintained many of those jail contracts despite a checkered history. The state's Medical Review Board, which evaluated the company's performance at the 13 upstate jails several years ago, documented "egregious lapses in medical care" involving six inmate deaths at five county jails between 2009 and 2012. Despite the oversight, the company tasked with handling the monitoring for the state has issued two reports that found serious lapses in CMC's operations at jails, including employing unlicensed and inexperienced staff, inadequate staffing and a "failure to adhere to medical and administrative protocols." Albany County recently terminated the $3.7 million annual contract it had with CMC since 2012. In a deposition taken last month as part of a federal wrongful-death lawsuit filed by Cannon's mother, Sheriff Craig Apple testified the company's "performance" played a role in his decision, though he said the change was also based on a better offer from another company. In the deposition, Apple was asked what he thought of the jailhouse videos that showed Cannon's 12-hour ordeal. "As a layperson and as the sheriff, I saw what would be considered a complete lack of compassion," he said in response to questions from Elmer Robert Keach III, the attorney for Cannon's mother. Jail video footage, state investigative reports and depositions filed in court records reveal the multiple missteps and negligent medical care that state investigators said contributed to Cannon's death. The videos show Cannon at times staggering through the facility as he was shuffled back and forth to the medical unit, at times begging guards and nurses for help before eventually becoming unable to stand or talk. State investigation reports and court records also reveal that CMC's nurses, two of whom were later disciplined by the State Education Department, violated multiple protocols, failures that began the moment a guard called the jail's medical office at 4:12 p.m. on Aug. 26, 2014, and informed them Cannon was having problems and needed assistance. Instead of going to Cannon's tier to check him out, as required, nurse Curtis Goyer told the officer to give Cannon some water and ask him lie down. Goyer also failed to notify the facility's health administrator there was a problem, as required, according to state investigators. "At the time I didn't feel as though he was experiencing a medical emergency," Goyer testified in April during a deposition in the wrongful death case, which is pending in federal court in Albany. "I made a medical determination, not a medical diagnosis." Less than an hour later, a sergeant was notified that Cannon was incapable of walking or standing. Medical staff were told to come to the tier. Goyer, during his deposition, acknowledged it can take about 30 minutes for nurses to get to an inmate's cell because of delays in obtaining an escort. When pressed on whether an inmate suffering a heart attack or other serious medical condition could die during the time it takes to get to their cell, Goyer responded, "I really have no feeling about it — that's the way it is there." He also said that to his knowledge, no nurse or anyone else employed by CMC had ever complained about the delays in responding to medical emergencies. Keach, the attorney for Cannon's mother, asked Goyer if similar delays in responding to a patient emergency would be acceptable at St. Peter's Hospital, where Goyer is also employed. "This is not St. Peter's, this is a jail," he answered. "I felt as though he was exhibiting signs of heat exhaustion, which is not uncommon for that time of year," Goyer explained. In the 10 hours that followed the initial visit by Goyer and a second CMC nurse to Cannon's cell, there were shift changes of nurses and correctional staff, and Cannon was shuffled back and forth between his tier and the medical infirmary. At times, cameras showed him staggering into walls and vomiting. Goyer admitted in his deposition that he did not conduct a neurological assessment of Cannon. "He did not present with any neurological facial deficit." By 10 p.m. that first night — roughly six hours after Cannon asked for help — officers continued pressing CMC staff to assist the inmate. "Each time, they were told that the inmate would be seen the next day for sick call and that he should continue to drink water," the state's investigation found. Just after 3 a.m., with new officers and nursing staff on duty, Cannon was found lying on the floor of his cell unable to talk. His eyes were open and he was foaming at the mouth; his legs were stiff and his arms limp. Officers scooped Cannon into a wheelchair and pushed him toward the infirmary. Videos of the transport show Cannon's head tilted to the left and his feet dragging beneath him. Despite his severe symptoms, no one called an ambulance. Kathleen Coogan, a CMC nurse, took Cannon's vital signs and waved an ammonia inhalant under his nose to see if he reacted. He pulled his head away. When Cannon was wheeled into an infirmary holding cell, cameras captured the scene as an officer pulled him out of the wheelchair and placed his limp body halfway onto a mattress on the floor. His feet were twitching, and Coogan said she continued to observe him on a live-camera feed and by peering through a window in the cell. Even at this point, no ambulance was called. The state's investigation determined Coogan "failed to conduct a basic nursing and neurological assessment on a patient with obvious signs and symptoms of a neurological crisis ... that she thought Cannon had a seizure and that she would just watch him for a while." Cannon remained motionless on the mattress for another hour. The cameras showed Coogan going in to see him at 4:30 a.m., and wiping his face and patting his arm. It was more than 12 hours after Cannon pleaded with guards that something was wrong and he needed medical help. Finally, Coogan called a doctor on call for CMC, who instructed her to call an ambulance. It would take nearly another hour for Cannon to be removed from the jail and taken to a hospital. Emre Umar of Blue Bell, Pa., is president of CMC, a for-profit company owned by his wife, Maria Carpio. Neither are licensed medical professionals. Umar has acknowledged that for more than 10 years the company operated in New York in violation of state law requiring medical-care companies to be owned by a physician. The firm has since restructured to adhere to the law, although Umar remains in charge of its operations. A year ago, in a pre-trial deposition taken as part of a federal lawsuit filed on behalf of an inmate who died at the Ulster County jail, where CMC was the medical provider, Umar acknowledged multiple and repeated lapses by his employees through the years. Still, he defended CMC's work. "If you care so much about the people that you're trying to provide care for, why have so many of them died under difficult circumstances such as detailed in all the various Commission of Correction reports?" an attorney asked Umar. "I think you would have to look at the physical state that the individual is in when they come into the facility, and then you will find out that we do not kill people. We do not let people die," Umar said. "These are people that have had no medical care throughout their entire lives, never seen a physician. They are drug abusers, they are alcoholics. So, you know, what you're saying is a total inaccurate statement." He also acknowledged that since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act — or Obamacare — many inmates are being enrolled in government-funded health care. Prior to that, Umar admitted, sending an inmate to a hospital would lower CMC's profit margin because some of the costs would come out of their contract revenues. But he denied that there was a systemic problem, or that any staff members were prohibited or discouraged from sending inmates to a hospital in an emergency. ''We pride ourselves on doing a good job and we do not deny medical care even if it affects our bottom line," Umar said. Keach, the attorney for Cannon's mother, said New York should ban CMC from doing business in the state of New York. "It's time for the regulators to act," Keach said. "Mr. Umar's business model directly correlates profits with the denial of medical care, and he and his wife ... have made millions from that correlation."

Schenectady County Jail, New York
Sep 3, 2017 dailygazette.com
Schenectady jail death case settles for $100,000
SCHENECTADY — A lawsuit over a suicide at the Schenectady County Jail in 2014 was settled for just over $100,000, according to recently filed legal documents. Judge Daniel Stewart approved the settlement late last month, finding the amount appropriate, given the details of the case, which involved the death of Lucky Wilkins. The judge also ruled that the settlement be made public, going against requests by both the jail medical provider and attorneys for the estate of the man who died. In all, Correctional Medical Care agreed to pay $101,500 to Wilkins' estate to end the case, while denying the underlying allegations of improper care. The settlement involved no county money, Schenectady County Attorney Christopher Gardner has said. Correctional Medical Care covers legal costs and payouts in all such lawsuits. Jail employees discovered Wilkins dead in his cell on May 28, 2014. He had a sheet around his neck, the other end tied to a bar at the top of his cell. State correction officials closed the matter as a suicide, but Wilkins' estate contended Wilkins showed signs of severe depression during his two months in jail, where he was being held on drug-related charges. Wilkins' estate alleged he sought assistance for depression from medical staff at the jail and at Ellis Hospital but was never provided any meaningful help. The estate originally included claims against Ellis, but those were later dropped. The suit alleged Wilkins received no medical treatment, causing his death. Attorney E. Robert Keach represented Wilkins' estate. He would not comment on Monday. Representatives of Correctional Medical Care did not respond to requests for comment. In his ruling, the judge noted that Wilkins' two children will be the beneficiaries of the settlement. Keach noted in the original lawsuit that there have been previous allegations against Correctional Medical Care in Schenectady County and elsewhere — he highlighted a state attorney general's settlement with the company — in outlining what he called a "pattern of difficulties." Keach also represented the family of Nicole Carmen, who died in Schenectady County custody on April 29, 2013. She died from complications of opiate withdrawal, her suit contended. Carmen's family later won a $425,000 settlement from Correctional Medical Care. The judge in that case, David N. Hurd, also rejected a request from the attorneys to keep that resolution confidential and sealed. Stewart, the judge in the Wilkins case, cited the Carman settlement decision in his ruling to make the Wilkins settlement public. In ordering the Carmen payout to be disclosed publicly, Hurd cited the significance of the allegations and the substantial settlement. He also cited prior allegations against CMC, finding a "strong public interest" in the Carmen settlement. Correctional Medical Care's contract with the county ran out in December but has been extended, Gardner said. The county is preparing a request for proposals to determine whether Correctional Medical Care or another company gets the next contract, Gardner said. He said Monday he hopes to have that process concluded by the end of the year.

Apr 29, 2017 dailygazette.com
Lawsuit filed in Schenectady County inmate's death
Schenectady County Jail medical staff failed to provide proper medication to a man with a variety of ailments, leading to his death last year, a new lawsuit contends.  Jimmy Richardson, 53, of Emmett Street, died at the jail Jan. 17, 2016, of a heart issue. The lawsuit contends he managed his health concerns outside the jail, but that the jail medical staff contributed to his death by withholding some medication and changing pain medication. "While [Richardson] was obviously not the healthiest person, he had been successfully managing his medical conditions for several years. It was not until the defendants denied him his medication for several weeks ... that [Richardson] died," the suit reads, adding that the defendants' actions caused his death. Richardson's widow, Bernita Richardson, filed the suit last week in federal court in Albany seeking unspecified damages. Attorney E. Robert Keach is representing the estate. Named as defendants are the jail's medical provider Correctional Medical Care, Schenectady County and individuals connected to the jail and medical provider. Schenectady County Attorney Christopher Gardner on Thursday said the county is reviewing the case, but reserved comments on the allegations. Correctional Medical Care President Emre Umar issued a statement Friday saying that, while the company is "always saddened to learn about any loss of life or negative medical outcome," it "stands by the quality of services provided." Umar noted that jails house "a population with the highest levels of chronic disease, mental health and substance-abuse problems," and the company employs thousands of qualified and caring professionals. "It has become a cottage industry for some plaintiffs’ attorneys to abuse public perception and distort and exaggerate facts under the pretense that they care about this patient population, doing so for their own personal financial gain," Umar's statement reads. "This complaint, like any other, will go through the litigation process to separate facts from unfounded allegations." According to the lawsuit, Richardson "died a preventable death." Richardson suffered from a series of ailments, including a cardiac disease called Brugada's Syndrome that can cause sudden death. He took various medications to address his conditions. He also took strong opiate pain medication that can cause withdrawal symptoms if stopped, the suit reads. Richardson was jailed twice in the weeks leading up to his death, first for five days in December 2015, then again starting Jan. 4, 2016. The suit alleges he wasn't provided with any of his medication in his first stint at the jail and that records showing he received medication from the start of his second stint are fabricated. The suit notes that attorneys are still waiting for Richardson's pharmacy records, but based the fabrication allegations on a medical provider's note in conflict with his jail medical records and numerous handwritten "sick call" slips written by Richardson. He wrote in one dated Jan. 11, 2016, included in the suit "I am Hurting so Bad I need Help!!!" Medical records did record that Richardson did not receive any pain medication beyond Tylenol until Jan. 13, 2016, the suit reads, due to an apparent problem with a prescription written by a jail doctor. However, the prescription also changed his pain medication to morphine without consulting his personal doctor. He then received overdoses, the suit alleges. The night before he died, the suit alleges that Richardson again sought help and was in "obvious need of medical assistance," but a corrections officer threatened him with disciplinary action and denied him care. "The case is obviously in the early stages and we need more information," Keach said Thursday, "but Mr. Richardson's death is certainly indicative of a disturbing pattern of deaths at correctional facilities where health care is overseen by Correctional Medical Care." Keach has brought lawsuits for other deaths at the Schenectady County Jail and elsewhere related to Correctional Medical Care's work. He filed a lawsuit in January over the death of 57-year-old Michael Revels, alleging Schenectady County Jail medical officials continually interrupted his medication, leading to his November 2015 death. That case remains pending. Keach earlier won a $425,000 settlement in a 2013 Schenectady County Jail death and an undisclosed settlement in the 2014 suicide of an inmate at the jail after his suit contended he sought help for depression. Any settlements involve no county money as part of the county's agreement with the company, Gardner has said. Correctional Medical Care's contract with the county ran out in December and has been extended through June, Gardner said. The county is preparing a request for proposals to determine whether Correctional Medical Care or another company gets the next contract, Gardner said.

Feb 4, 2017 PCWG dailygazette.com
Suit filed in death of Schenectady County inmate
Schenectady County Jail medical officials failed to properly care for an inmate in 2015, resulting in his death, according to a new lawsuit. Michael Revels, 57, who entered the jail in September 2015, was a kidney cancer survivor who required constant medication, the suit reads. By mid-November 2015, constant interruptions to his medication left him near death, Revels' family contends. He died at the hospital shortly afterward because of faulty care while in the jail's custody, the suit reads. "These conditions could have been easily treated had Mr. Revels been sent to the hospital or been monitored by a qualified medical provider" during his time at the jail, the suit reads. Revels estate is suing the jail's medical provider, Correctional Medical Care, as well as Schenectady County and several individuals. They filed the suit in federal court in Albany last week. An attorney for Correctional Medical Care could not be reached Monday. Schenectady County Attorney Christopher Gardner said the county believes there's no basis for the suit. According to the suit, Revels' medication regimen began to be routinely interrupted upon entering the jail. He received the wrong medication, failed to get refills and received cheaper and less effective medication, it alleges. He underwent tests at the jail, but no real treatment, the suit reads. The jail medical staff made no contact with Revels' specialists and made decisions without being medically qualified to do so, the suit continues. Jail officers found Revels unconscious in his cell on Nov. 18, 2015, but he wasn't hospitalized until two days later. Revels fell into a coma and died at the hospital Nov. 25, 2015, the suit reads. The suit also contends jail officials sought and won Revels' release after transporting him to the hospital, a move that placed the financial burden of the hospital stay on his family. The estate's attorney, E. Robert Keach, has sued Correctional Medical Care multiple times in the past, winning settlements that include a $425,000 settlement in a 2013 Schenectady County Jail death. Keach cites several of the previous cases in his suit, calling the Revels case part of a "well-documented pattern" of the company providing inadequate care. Another lawsuit in a Schenectady County Jail death was settled earlier this month, records show. Details of that settlement have yet to be released. Such settlements involve no county money, Gardner has said. The medical provider covers all such lawsuits. Payouts, if any, are fully paid by CMC. The county budgets about $2.5 million for inmate health services overall. The jail saw about 3,000 inmates booked in 2015, requiring 23,000 medical encounters, officials have said. Overall, the county is satisfied with the care provided by CMC, Gardner said. "The county and the sheriff are continually monitoring any issues that may arise ... and we're constantly working to improve the provision of medical care," Gardner said.

Jan 15, 2017 dailygazette.com
New York: Wrongful death suit settled
SCHENECTADY -- The estate of a man who took his own life in the Schenectady County Jail in 2014 has reached a settlement with the jail's medical provider in a lawsuit filed over the death, records show. Details of the settlement over the death of 29-year-old Lucky Lee Wilkins Jr., were not available Wednesday, but U.S. District Court records indicate the two sides reached the agreement after lengthy discussions last week. Whatever the settlement is, Schenectady County Attorney Christopher Gardner indicated it involves no county money. The jail's medical provider, Correctional Medical Care, chose to settle the case, Gardner noted. The settlement agreement now goes to the presiding judge, Magistrate Judge Daniel J. Stewart, for approval. Stewart will also decide on a request to seal the details of the settlement. A different judge rejected a request to seal details in a similar Schenectady County Jail case settlement a year ago. Wilkins died in county custody on May 28, 2014. Jail employees discovered him with a sheet around his neck, the other end tied to a bar at the top of the cell, according to court documents. He had been jailed on a felony drug charge for more than two months and was being held on $25,000 bail. In the original lawsuit, filed in August 2015, his estate contended Wilkins showed signs of severe depression, including suicidal thoughts, during his time in the jail. The estate alleged  Wilkins sought assistance for depression from medical staff at the jail and at Ellis Hospital but was never provided any meaningful care. The estate originally included claims against Ellis, but those were later dropped. The suit alleged Wilkins received no medical treatment, causing his eath. The attorney for Wilkins' estate, E. Robert Keach, refused to comment on the settlement. An attorney for Correctional Medical Care could not be reached Wednesday. While no taxpayer money is going to the settlement, Gardner said the county doesn't think there was "any wrongdoing on anyone's part." The state Commission of Corrections, which looks into all in-custody deaths, issued its final report in the fall that showed fellow inmates told investigators Wilkins had been upset over a breakup with his girlfriend and over his criminal case. The public portion of the redacted report, released Wednesday as a result of a Freedom of Information Law request, includes no testimony or indication that Wilkins reached out for help from staff or others. The report recommended the investigation be closed as a suicide. Correctional Medical Care covers all such lawsuits. Payouts, if any, are fully paid by CMC. Keach noted in the original lawsuit that there have been previous allegations against Correctional Medical Care in Schenectady County and elsewhere. He also noted a state attorney general's settlement with the company, in alleging a "pattern of difficulties." Keach also represented the family of Nicole Carmen, who died in Schenectady County custody on April 29, 2013. She died from complications of opiate withdrawal, her suit contended. Carmen's family won a $425,000 settlement from Correctional Medical Care. The judge in that case, David N. Hurd, rejected a request from the attorneys to keep that resolution confidential and sealed. Hurd noted the significance of the allegations in the case and the substantial settlement in ordering the Carmen resolution to be publicly disclosed. He also cited the prior allegations, finding a "strong public interest" that the Carmen settlement should be open.

Feb 13, 2016 timesunion.com
$10 million each sought for two inmate deaths at Schenectady County Jail
The estates of an inmate with major heart-related problems who died in his cell at the Schenectady County Jail and another prisoner at the facility who survived kidney cancer only to become so badly bloated that he died at Ellis Hospital have put the county on notice that they plan to file wrongful death suits. The deaths of Michael Revels and Jimmy Richardson occurred about 2½ months apart and a notice of claim filed Friday by their attorney alleges both might still be alive if they had received proper medical care from Correctional Medical Care Inc., a firm the county has contracted for years to treat its inmates. During that time, Elmer Keach III, an attorney representing Revels and Richardson, contends the county was negligent in hiring the Philadelphia-area company as a medical provider at the jail, "given the company's troubled past." Sheriff Dominic Dagostino and County Attorney Chris Gardner rejected the allegations. "It's our position that regardless of who the medical provider was or is that the outcome would have been the same with regard to these three individuals because of their declining health," said Dagostino. The third inmate the sheriff mentioned is Terrance Duncan. He died at the jail in August. On Friday, Dagostino said officials are awaiting toxicology results as part of their internal probe into Duncan's death. Keach contends that what he generally sees is that CMC doesn't provide inmates with adequate follow-up care after being notified by correction officers of health issues. He surmised the company receives incentives for steering inmates to the hospital. County Attorney Chris Gardner dismissed Keach's claim against CMC as a "bright shining lie," stressing that the county pays for any extra medical costs, including hospitalization and specialty care that inmates require. "We believe they are patently baseless lawsuits," Gardner added. He noted with the more than 3,000 inmates housed at the jail each year, there will be some who are really sick and their time behind bars is for many defendants is the first time they receive adequate medical care. "We do provide very good medical care to the inmates, and not all inmates are going to be healthy," said Gardner. Correctional Medical Care did not return a call Friday seeking comment. The notices of claim, precursors of a lawsuit, filed Friday on behalf of the estates of Revels and Richardson by their widows, separately seek $10 million in damages for each man's pain and suffering. Revels, 57, who was serving time for driving without a license, died Nov. 25. He was a kidney cancer survivor who required a diuretic medication to help his kidneys get rid of excess fluid from his body. At the jail, the notice of claim alleges, on several occasions Revels got the wrong medication or cheaper, less effective ones, or didn't get them at all. The court papers also contend that despite being well aware of his medical condition, the staff at the jail punished him for lying down in his cell when he felt sick before lock-in. By November, Revels' condition worsened to the point, the notice says, that he was regularly collapsing on the floor. He was found unconscious by medical and jail staff on Nov. 16 and Nov. 20. On the later date, the claim states Revels was taken to Ellis Hospital where he was so badly bloated that the doctor had to drain 7½ liters of fluid around his kidneys and other organs. There are about five liters of blood in the human body, the notice indicates. The fluid buildup sent Revels into cardiac arrest. He was taken off life support on Nov. 25. The notice of claim says after Revels died, the county secured his release and his wife got stuck with paying his remaining medical bills. In Richardson's case, he landed at the jail on Jan. 5, a day after being arrested by Schenectady police for violating an order of protection. He spent his first night in custody at Ellis Hospital for assorted medical problems ranging from high blood pressure to asthma and a potentially fatal irregular heartbeat. The notice of claim indicates that jail guards failed to check on Richardson, 53, or notify medical staff even though his breathing was so labored that other inmates could hear him gurgling all night long. At the time, Richardson was on a medical supervision status, meaning the correction officers should have been checking him every 15 minutes. The notice says that on Jan. 17 Richardson, who was awaiting trial on a criminal contempt charge, died alone in his cell of high blood pressure, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia and an enlarged heart. It also alleges jail and medical staff should have known about Richardson's health problems because he had been incarcerated at the facility in 2015 and had not received the proper medical care or his medication, resulting in him experiencing breathing problems. "Failing to provide medical treatment to someone experiencing severe breathing problems is inexcusable," the notice of claim states. "There is no question that officials at the Schenectady County jail knew about Mr. Richardson's serious medical condition, as he had informed them about his condition on several prior incarcerations. Nevertheless, Mr. Richardson would be alive today if he was provided appropriate and timely medical treatment and supervision."

Feb 7, 2016 timesunion.com
$10 million each sought for two inmate deaths at Schenectady County Jail
The estates of an inmate with major heart-related problems who died in his cell at the Schenectady County Jail and another prisoner at the facility who survived kidney cancer only to become so badly bloated that he died at Ellis Hospital have put the county on notice that they plan to file wrongful death suits. The deaths of Michael Revels and Jimmy Richardson occurred about 2½ months apart and a notice of claim filed Friday by their attorney alleges both might still be alive if they had received proper medical care from Correctional Medical Care Inc., a firm the county has contracted for years to treat its inmates. During that time, Elmer Keach III, an attorney representing Revels and Richardson, contends the county was negligent in hiring the Philadelphia-area company as a medical provider at the jail, "given the company's troubled past." Sheriff Dominic Dagostino and County Attorney Chris Gardner rejected the allegations. "It's our position that regardless of who the medical provider was or is that the outcome would have been the same with regard to these three individuals because of their declining health," said Dagostino. The third inmate the sheriff mentioned is Terrance Duncan. He died at the jail in August. On Friday, Dagostino said officials are awaiting toxicology results as part of their internal probe into Duncan's death. Keach contends that what he generally sees is that CMC doesn't provide inmates with adequate follow-up care after being notified by correction officers of health issues. He surmised the company receives incentives for steering inmates to the hospital. County Attorney Chris Gardner dismissed Keach's claim against CMC as a "bright shining lie," stressing that the county pays for any extra medical costs, including hospitalization and specialty care that inmates require. "We believe they are patently baseless lawsuits," Gardner added. He noted with the more than 3,000 inmates housed at the jail each year, there will be some who are really sick and their time behind bars is for many defendants is the first time they receive adequate medical care. "We do provide very good medical care to the inmates, and not all inmates are going to be healthy," said Gardner. Correctional Medical Care did not return a call Friday seeking comment. The notices of claim, precursors of a lawsuit, filed Friday on behalf of the estates of Revels and Richardson by their widows, separately seek $10 million in damages for each man's pain and suffering. Revels, 57, who was serving time for driving without a license, died Nov. 25. He was a kidney cancer survivor who required a diuretic medication to help his kidneys get rid of excess fluid from his body. At the jail, the notice of claim alleges, on several occasions Revels got the wrong medication or cheaper, less effective ones, or didn't get them at all. The court papers also contend that despite being well aware of his medical condition, the staff at the jail punished him for lying down in his cell when he felt sick before lock-in. By November, Revels' condition worsened to the point, the notice says, that he was regularly collapsing on the floor. He was found unconscious by medical and jail staff on Nov. 16 and Nov. 20. On the later date, the claim states Revels was taken to Ellis Hospital where he was so badly bloated that the doctor had to drain 7½ liters of fluid around his kidneys and other organs. There are about five liters of blood in the human body, the notice indicates. The fluid buildup sent Revels into cardiac arrest. He was taken off life support on Nov. 25. The notice of claim says after Revels died, the county secured his release and his wife got stuck with paying his remaining medical bills. In Richardson's case, he landed at the jail on Jan. 5, a day after being arrested by Schenectady police for violating an order of protection. He spent his first night in custody at Ellis Hospital for assorted medical problems ranging from high blood pressure to asthma and a potentially fatal irregular heartbeat. The notice of claim indicates that jail guards failed to check on Richardson, 53, or notify medical staff even though his breathing was so labored that other inmates could hear him gurgling all night long. At the time, Richardson was on a medical supervision status, meaning the correction officers should have been checking him every 15 minutes. The notice says that on Jan. 17 Richardson, who was awaiting trial on a criminal contempt charge, died alone in his cell of high blood pressure, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia and an enlarged heart. It also alleges jail and medical staff should have known about Richardson's health problems because he had been incarcerated at the facility in 2015 and had not received the proper medical care or his medication, resulting in him experiencing breathing problems. "Failing to provide medical treatment to someone experiencing severe breathing problems is inexcusable," the notice of claim states. "There is no question that officials at the Schenectady County jail knew about Mr. Richardson's serious medical condition, as he had informed them about his condition on several prior incarcerations. Nevertheless, Mr. Richardson would be alive today if he was provided appropriate and timely medical treatment and supervision."